Developing countries and global trade negotiations
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Developing countries and global trade negotiations

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Published by Routledge in London, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Developing countries -- Commerce.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Larry Crump and S. Javed Maswood.
SeriesRoutledge advances in international relations and global politics -- 55
ContributionsCrump, Larry., Maswood, Syed Javed.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHF1413 .D47 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 208 p. :
Number of Pages208
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22749860M
ISBN 100415417341, 0203962834
ISBN 109780415417341, 9780203962831

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Introduction: Developing Countries and Global Trade Negotiations 1. Growing Power Meets Frustration in the Doha Round’s First Four Years 2. Developing Countries and the G20 in the Doha Round 3. Agricultural Tariff and Subsidy Cuts in the Doha Round 4. Summary: Leading US, Australian and Asian academics explore the role and position of developing countries in global trade negotiations. They examine both how developing countries form alliances to negotiate in the WTO meetings and look at specific issues affecting developing countries including trade in services.   Contributing to an understanding of the dynamics of trade negotiations and the future of multilateralism, Developing Countries and Global Trade Negotiations will appeal to students and scholars in the fields of international trade, international negotiations, IPE and international : Taylor And Francis. "Narlikar’s book is an impressively rigorous and informed study of the role and efficacy of bargaining coalitions, especially but not exclusively of developing countries, for trade negotiations in both the GATT (especially the Uruguay Round) and the WTO (up to Doha).Cited by:

Developing Countries and Global Trade Negotiations The Doha round of WTO negotiations commenced in November to further liberalise international trade and to specifically seek to remove trade barriers so developing countries might compete in major markets. Contributing to an understanding of the dynamics of trade negotiations and the future of multilateralism, Developing Countries and Global Trade Negotiations will appeal to students and scholars in the fields of international trade, international negotiations, IPE and international : Taylor And Francis. Abstract. For much of the post-war era, the stance of developing countries towards international trade negotiations has encompassed two somewhat contradictory strategies: on the one hand, considerable energy in maintaining the unity of a developing country bloc that vocally expressed concern over the existing trading system and demanded changes in it; on the other, a relatively passive Cited by: McMillan J. () A Game-Theoretic View of International Trade Negotiations: Implications for the Developing Countries. In: Whalley J. (eds) Developing Countries and the Global Trading System. Palgrave Macmillan, London.

  Global Agricultural Trade and Developing Countries presents research findings based on a series of commodity studies of significant economic importance to developing countries. The book 3/5(2). Making Global Trade Governance Work for Development gathers a diversity of developing country views on how to improve the governance of global trade and the WTO to better advance sustainable development and respond to the needs of developing countries. Buy Developing Countries and Global Trade Negotiations (Routledge Advances in International Relations and Global Politics) 1 by Crump, Larry, Maswood, S. Javed (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Paperback. 94 Other measures concerning developing countries in the WTO agreements include: • extra timefor developing countries to fulfil their commitments (in many of the WTO agreements) • provisions designed to increase developing countries’ trading opportunities through greater market access (e.g. in textiles, services, technical barriers to trade).